Monday, May 18, 2015

Christin's Quote Book

  • When the people fear their government there is tyranny; when the government fears the people, there is liberty. —Thomas Jefferson
  • College football is a sport that bears the same relation to education that bullfighting does to agriculture. ―Elbert Hubbard
  • My grandmother is over eighty and she still doesn’t need glasses. Drinks right out of the bottle. —Henny Youngman
  • Our culture has accepted two huge lies: The first is that if you disagree with someone’s lifestyle, you must fear them or hate them. The second is that to love someone means you agree with everything they believe or do. Both are nonsense. You don’t have to compromise convictions to be compassionate. —Rick Warren
  • The virtues of men are of more consequence to society than their abilities; and for this reason, the heart should be cultivated with more assiduity than the head. —Noah Webster

Tuesday, May 12, 2015

GCPC Sermons and Lessons ― Mp3s


These Mp3 files are all uploaded to the church website 
and are also available as Podcasts.

NOTE: There are many other sermons and lessons available on the church website.

FOR THE WEBSITE
Go HERE: and click the LAUNCH MEDIA PLAYER button at the bottom of the page.  Then click on the SERIES column heading and this will sort the files by series. You can then scroll down and find the series and title you want. You can either click on the window at the top and listen or else RIGHT CLICK on the file and download this to your computer. For those who know how, these can be transferred to your phone.

FOR PODCAST:
For iPhones and iPads, go to your Podcast Icon and search for: “GCPC Nacogdoches.” This should pull up a complete list of our current podcasts. If you would like regular updates when new podcasts are available, then hit the SUBSCRIBE button.

For Android phones and devices, there are a handful of terrific apps out there that let you download and manage podcasts directly from your mobile device. Here are a couple of free apps Podcast Addict and Podcast Republic. Again, search for: “GCPC Nacogdoches.”

“Who’s to Say?” ― series of sermons (ongoing)
  1. The Dangers of Being Deceived – 4-19-15
  2. Loving the Law – 4-26-15
  3. Being Kinder Than God – 5-3-15
  4. Me or Thee? – 5-10-15



“Members of the Body” ― Sunday School Lessons (ongoing)
  1. Introduction – 1-4-15
  2. The Holy Catholic Church – 1-11-15
  3. The Visible and Invisible Church – 1-18-15
  4. The Creedal Church – 1-25-15
  5. The Confessional Church – 2-1-15
  6. The Denominational Church – 2-8-15
  7. The Local Church (part 1) – 2-22-15
  8. The Local Church (part 2) – 3-8-15
  9. The Local Church (part 3) – 3-15-15
  10. Worship – 3-22-15
  11. Covenant Community (part 1) – 3-29-15
  12. Covenant Community (part 2) – 4-19-15
  13. Evangelism (part 1) – 4-26-15
  14. Evangelism (part 2) – 5-3-15
  15. Membership Responsibilities (part 1) – 5-10-15

Monday, May 11, 2015

Christin's Quote Book

  • One useless man is a shame, two is a law firm, and three or more is a Congress. –John Adams
  • Don’t carry a grudge. While you’re carrying the grudge the other guy’s out dancing. –Buddy Hackett
  • Certainly there are lots of things in life that money won’t buy, but have you ever tried to buy them without money? —Ogden Nash
  • Self-esteem comes from achievements, not from lax standards and false praise. ―Condoleezza Rice
  • Rogues are preferable to imbeciles because they sometimes take a rest. –Alexander Dumas

Sunday, May 10, 2015

A Toast to Mothers

Children love fat mothers. They like them because while any mother is a diagram of place, a picture of home, a fat one is a clearer diagram, a greater sacrament. She is more there. I can think of no better wish to all the slender swans of this present age than to propose them a toast: “May your husbands find you as slim as they like; your children should always remember you were fat.”

– Robert Farrar Capon, Bed and Board (p. 66)

Monday, May 4, 2015

Christin's Quote Book

  • Good manners will open doors that the best education cannot. ―Clarence Thomas
  • A liberal is someone who feels a great debt to his fellow man, which debt he proposes to pay off with your money. –G. Gordon Liddy
  • Socialism has a record of failure so blatant that only an intellectual could ignore or evade it. –Thomas Sowell
  • Miracles are a retelling in small letters of the very same story which is written across the whole world in letters too large for some of us to see. –C. S. Lewis
  • You wouldn’t worry so much about what others think of you if you realized how seldom they do. –Eleanor Roosevelt

Wednesday, April 29, 2015

P. J. O'Rourke

  • The idea of capitalism is not just success but also the failure that allows success to happen.
  • Never fight an inanimate object.
  • Giving money and power to government is like giving whiskey and car keys to teenage boys.
  • The number of American presidential candidates varies with the sunspot cycle and the phases of the moon.
  • Like most sensible people, you probably lost interest in modern art about the time that Julian Schnabel was painting broken pieces of the crockery that his wife had thrown at him for painting broken pieces of crockery instead of painting the bathroom and hall.
  • The world is being run by irresponsible spoiled brats.
  • The two most frightening words in Washington are 'bipartisan consensus.' Bipartisan consensus is when my doctor and my lawyer agree with my wife that I need help.
  • Always read something that will make you look good if you die in the middle of it.
  • A hat should be taken off when you greet a lady and left off for the rest of your life. Nothing looks more stupid than a hat.
  • Ending wars is very simple if you surrender.
  • In the language of politics, there is only one translation for the phrase 'hope and change,' to wit: 'big, fat government.'
  • Wealth is not a pizza, where if I have too many slices you have to eat the Domino's box.
  • A Kindle returns us to the inconvenience of the scroll, except with batteries and electronic glitches. It's as handy as bringing Homer along to recite the 'Iliad' while playing a lyre.
  • Some day you will be wheeled in for a heart bypass operation, and a surgeon will be the person who is now behind the counter when you renew your car registration at the department of motor vehicles.
  • Term limits aren't enough. We need jail.
  • Stupid is a great force in human affairs.

Tuesday, April 28, 2015

God Has to Go

I suspect that if Christians would cede two or three points then the world would be happy to leave us alone and let us fritter away our lives without them.  First, the doctrine of creation must go and with it the inferred authority of the Creator.  Undermining the book of Genesis is critical in this effort to rid the world of God’s Word, which was the very issue in the Garden of Eden:  “Has God said?”  Second, the exclusive claims of Jesus, or to put it another way, the Lordship of Jesus is intolerable.  This doctrine demonstrates that the Christian faith is intolerant and, of course, they can have none of that. Perhaps He can sit at the table, but He can never be the chairman of the board. The third obnoxious thing about Christians is their doctrine of sexuality. This strikes at the very heart of the matter and is really an expression of the first two issues.

Sexuality is one of the main battle fronts in the effort to expel God from the universe.  Oscar Wilde observed that:  “Everything in the world is about sex except sex.  Sex is about power.”  I think he’s on to something.  There in the first chapter of the Bible, God not only gives man and woman the task of subduing the earth, He also gives them one of the most powerful tools that they will need to accomplish that task.  Their maleness and femaleness are essential for several reasons.  First, the two (i.e., the man and the woman) shall become one flesh―united in covenant and purpose.  Second, this is what enables them to be fruitful and multiply and fill the earth [biology].  Third, they’re called to a mission, not only to fill the earth, but to fill it with godly offspring, which requires a godly family.  Worship is the ultimate end.

Adam and Eve wanted to do things their way.  They wanted to be as God; to determine good and evil for themselves.  As sin entered into the world, every aspect of mankind was dramatically altered, including their sexuality.  It remained no less a powerful force but now it became a destructive force.  A chainsaw is powerful for cutting firewood but a chainsaw in the hands of an eight-year-old running through the house is no less powerful; it is a whole lot more destructive.  This is why many of the most severe penal sanctions in the Bible are reserved for the misuse of this powerful and destructive force.  The effect of the corruption of sexuality is seen all the time in every place.  Individuals, families and societies suffer in a host of ways.  This is always the result of man doing things his own way.  Wisdom says in Proverbs 8:36, “All those who hate me love death,” and in Proverbs 13:15, “The way of the transgressor is hard.” The world loves to show you the glamorous side but never the dark side.

The current assault on marriage and the militant homo-jihad, along with the general pornification of the culture is the 3-D version of this hatred of God.  Sex and sexuality were created by the Creator and He has spoken concerning their legitimate use.  The world will have none of this.  He is not going to tell us what to do with our bodies.  We will determine good and evil for ourselves.  The Greek word “pornia” refers to all sorts of sexual sins.  It is interesting that pornia is frequently associated (in the Bible) with idolatry, or the worship of a false god.  R. J Rushdoony wrote about the “politics of pornography,” in his book, Law and Liberty. Here is an excerpt from that book:

Now the first thing which is apparent in pornography is its obvious hatred of morality, its marked distaste for Biblical faith and morals.  Moral restraint is seen as bondage for man, a slavery which must be destroyed.  As a result, pornography indulges endlessly in long, tasteless, and highly emotional attacks on morality, on the sanctity of marriage, on monogamy, and on every kind of moral inhibition.  It seeks to fan the flames of moral rebellion, to see morality as dull and restrictive, and immorality and perversion as exciting and liberating.  Although people will attempt to prove almost anything these days it would be an impossibility to prove that pornography is not hostile to Biblical faith and morality, because it so obviously reeks with hatred and hostility.

A second observation is equally obvious:  pornography sees a tremendous appeal in moral evil.  Morality is seen as tedious and confining, as utterly boring and restrictive, whereas evil is portrayed as man’s liberation.  Evil has the potency of a magnetic force for the pornographer. The vitality, potency, and possibility of life are wrapped up in evil. Truly to live means for him evil, a commitment to and an involvement in moral evil.  Man is not really alive, we are told, if he lives morally; life means evil; it means what is called sin and perversion.  Only the person who sins is truly alive, it is held.  Evil, for these people, is life.

Third, it can be further stated that for the pornographer morality is death.  To confine men and women to the prison house of morality, marriage, law, and order is seen as equivalent to a sentence of death.  Since evil is life, morality is logically death, and this is the religious faith of pornography.  The gospel for man is thus evil; sin is the way of salvation, and the way to life and liberty.  This faith is insistently presented, and with a religious fervor, and with good reason, because its roots are in an ancient religious faith, Manichaeanism, and also in various cults of chaos. For this faith, sin is life. Researchers a few years ago found that many people commit adultery, not because of any desire for the other person, but because of a fear that they will miss out on life if they do not sin. This is in essence the position of pornography—it offers sin and evil, and it declares it to be true life precisely because it is sin and evil.

Fourth, pornography manifests a hostility to the very idea of law and morality.  Law means for it something inhibiting and stultifying, a deadening restraint upon man.  Morality is held to be the dead hand of the past, the fearful and death-oriented will of men bound to superstition and fear.  The destiny of man is to be free from law, according to these men, and the way to be free is to begin by breaking the law, by violating morality.  Man’s freedom is to be free from law, free to do as one pleases, and the mark of this freedom is the deliberate violation of all law and order.  Very briefly, this position is one of moral anarchism.  Man’s greatest enemy is religion, morality, and law.  Eliminate religious and moral law, and all the evils of human life will disappear.  Man and the state can then reconstruct society in terms of man’s liberation from God and create a truly human order, the great society of humanism, the city of man.


[Law and Liberty, “The Politics of Pornography,” R. J. Rushdoony, (1984: pp. 22-23). http://libertyalliance.com/books/PDFs/rushdoony_law_and_liberty.pdf

Monday, April 27, 2015

Christin's Quote Book

  • Everywhere I go I’m asked if I think the university stifles writers. My opinion is that they don’t stifle enough of them. There’s many a bestseller that could have been prevented by a good teacher. —Flannery O’Connor
  • The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him. –G. K. Chesterton
  • People occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of them pick themselves up and hurry off as if nothing had happened. –Winston Churchill
  • A cynic is a man who, when he smells flowers, looks around for a coffin.   ―H. L. Mencken
  • In the war on the unborn, every day is another 9/11. —Mike Adams

Friday, April 24, 2015

A Normal Girl

Toward the end of C. S. Lewis’ Screwtape Letters, the senior demon, Screwtape is giving a toast to the graduates of the College of Temptors and discussing some great problems his generation was able to create in the hearts of the humans. Specifically, he is talking about the desire to be “normal” and “like everyone else”, he says:
All is summed up in the prayer which a young female human is said to have uttered recently:  “O God, make me a normal twentieth-century girl!”  Thanks to our labors, this will mean increasingly:  “Make me a minx, a moron, and a parasite.” 

Thursday, April 23, 2015

American Christianity

An excerpt from Eugene Peterson’s, Under the Unpredictable Plant (1992), pp. 35-37.

… Religious activity on our continent is very popular. There is absolute religious freedom, which means that we can be reli­gious any old way we want to. But the way we want to doesn't turn out to be anything close to resembling the biblical origi­nals.

North American religion is basically a consumer religion. Americans see God as a product that will help them to live well, or to live better. Having seen that, they do what consumers do, shop for the best deal. Pastors, hardly realizing what we are doing, start making deals, packaging the God-product so that people will be attracted to it and then presenting it in ways that will beat out the competition. Religion has never been so taken up with public relations, image building, salesmanship, marketing techniques, and the competitive spirit. Pastors who grow up in this atmosphere have no awareness that there is anything out of the way in such practices...

… Far from being radical and dynamic, most religion is a lethargic rubber stamp on worldly wisdom, leading us not to freedom but, in Chesterton's words, to "the degrading slavery of being a child of [this] age."

Something similar took place in the field of education. Our educational priorities and practices have produced a popu­lation with a high degree of literacy so that virtually everyone has access to learning. The reading skills that used to be the privilege of a few people are now available to all. But with what result? TV Guide is our highest circulation magazine, with Reader's Digest a strong second. Our nation of readers uses its wonderful literacy to read billboards, commercials, watered down pep talks, and humorous anecdotes. I don't think I would voluntarily live in a place where education was available only to the wealthy and privileged, but simply providing everyone with the ability to read seems to have lowered rather than raised the intellectual level of the nation.


Likewise, I would never voluntarily live in a place where the freedom to choose and practice religion was illegal and had to be pursued underground, but when I look at the results of this most extensive experiment in the freedom of religion that the world has ever seen, I am not impressed. Surveyed as a whole, we are immersed in probably the most immature and mindless religion, ranging from infantile to adolescent, that any culture has ever witnessed.